Hexagonal Architecture For Testers: Part 2

This post is WIP & under iterative development!

This is part 2 of my mini series of posts on the hexagonal architecture pattern, its testing strategy & the impact on Testers.

The first post was an attempt to explain hexagonal architecture in a language I understand.

This post is focussed on the testing strategy associated with hexagonal architecture.

wellington-broken-pyramid
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Test Automation Basics – Levels, Pyramids & Quadrants

This post started life in my series on hexagonal architecture, but it got too unwieldy & not directly related to the topic so here it is in all its own glory.

This post is now a brief introduction to my understanding of test automation, the test automation pyramid & testing quadrants and is used as a reference for the hexagonal architecture series.

James Crisp Test Pyramid

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Hexagonal Architecture For Testers: Part 1

This post is WIP & under iterative development!

At my current client, we’re being coached in the Hexagonal Architecture pattern.

Admittedly, the primary focus is towards the Programmers, but the change in the development strategy has an impact on us Testers so we get a seat a table.

What is this change in the development strategy which will impact us Testers? The pattern considers integration tests as brittle & unneccessarily linking the business logic to the implementation. As such, with this pattern, you want as few integration tests as possible. So the question is:

As a Tester, how confident am I that the removal of (automated) integration tests have not decreased the stability of the code?

In this 3 part series, I hope to learn more about hexagonal architecture, what it does for the teams test strategy & what the impact is for Testers.

table & chairs representing hexagonal architecture
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Lets Test Keynote: Michael Bolton – If It’s Not Context-Driven, You Can’t Do It Here

Michael Bolton had the priviledge of the opening keynote of the conference & unsurprisingly he chose to talk about context-driven testing. Turns out his tongue-in-cheek title was taken as such by everyone, so he had to take some time explaining the irony in it! Slides for the “If It’s Not Context-Driven, You Can’t Do It Here” session are available here

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Let’s Test 2012: Visualisation of tweets

There were nearly 1000 tweets from the Let’s Test conference & I’d quite like to re-read them. Mohinder (@mpkhosla) has very kindly harvested the tweets here.

To help me read the tweets & see their relationships with each other, I decided to see if there was anyway I could visualise them to make them a bit less dry.

This post demonstrates a few of the ideas I’ve tried. The 3rd one is my favourite (so far)

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Lean Lego Game

Whilst researching for activities to do at North West Tester Gathering, Stu suggested we have a go at the Lego Game.

After some digging, I found & swotted up on the Lean Lego game. Turns out this wasn’t the game Stu was talking about – he was suggesting the Scrum Lego game.

Rather than letting what I learned about the Lean version of the game going to waste, I decided to try it out with my team on my current client site.
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