Surviving Scaled Agile – Understand the Vision / North Star

This is the fourth in a series of posts going into more detail around my thoughts on remaining an effective practitioner in scaled Agile – understand the programme Vision / North Star.

To get a wider context of this post, please refer to the original “Surviving Scaled Agile” post outlining the model.

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Surviving Scaled Agile – Jenga!

I’ve recently been working with project teams who are attempting to remain effective after their organisation has chosen to adopt the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe).

I’m trying capture & refine the common patterns I’ve observed across several SAFe implementations that have helped those involved in the implementation remain effective after they have been left wondering where they fit.

I’m hoping it will help others who have been in touch with me who are trying to understand what it means to be a practitioner in their newly formed SAFe organisation.

Jenga Blocks Tower
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Testing The Leading SAFe Certification

Several projects I am working on within my organisation are adopting SAFe in order to build software solutions, so I thought I should perform some SAFe testing!

With my Agile background, I am able to provide a lot of value in helping the teams follow an iterative development lifecycle (predominantly Scrum), but I have little experience of processes outside of the development teams themselves.

I also seem to struggle to get my message across to senior stakeholders within my organisation who are new to Agile & SAFe.

My hypothesis is that achieving the Leading SAFe Certification will help me

  1. with the process knowledge gap
  2. improve my communication with senior stakeholders

This post aims to outline what happened in the experiment…

Question-4-Level-SAFe-Big-Picture-4.0

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Experiments in Harmonic Mixing #1 – Round The Clock

It seems I have been living under a rock when it comes to what appears to be a fundamental tool in DJing (a side hobby of mine)

It’s called Harmonic Mixing which is the implementation of the Circle of fifths found in music theory.

This post is about my first foray into harmonic mixing & how I can improve my DJing by incorporating the skills into my toolbox.

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Batch Size Reduction and Software Testing

I’ve been studying Don Reinertsen‘s work on product development flow for some time. Whilst I talk about the ideas from a testing perspective, I’ve never actually attempted to get my thoughts on to paper.

I’m attending Don’s workshop on flow in Cambridge at the end of September, so I’m using this post to record my current thoughts so I can use them for reflection after the course.

These notes still need a lot of refining…

3-mini-burgers3

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What has the CDT Community ever done for me?

There’s been a lot of commentary on Twitter & in the blogosphere about the Context Driven Testing (CDT) community & in particular James Bach & Michael Bolton.

I wanted to take some time to reflect on how influential the CDT community has been for me, including the help, input & advice from James & Michael.

Obviously, there are so many in the CDT community I need to thank for helping me get to where I am today, but that is not the purpose of the post.

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The Orchestra – Different Parts, Same Outcome

I typically use the metaphor of an orchestra with Testers across different teams/products/squads within an organisation to help the understanding of how different testers can offer value within their teams.

The idea being that the argument “I test websites & they test data” is redundant when you’re thinking of the product or system as a whole

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Testing The River With Different Tools

As some of you may be aware, I like kayaking & I often like to use it as a metaphor for software development.

I realised I talk a lot about the similarities between kayaking & software testing, but it appears I’ve never written about it.

Please indulge me whilst I relate how we paddlers use different “tools” on the river to help us achieve different goals…

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